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Posts Tagged ‘Suburi shinai’

Suburi shinaiWhen I wrote “Kendo a Comprehensive Guide to Japanese Swordsmanship” my editor asked me to include a section on “hitori-geiko”, or individual practice. I felt that his thinking was to help align the book to the newbie and kendo curious markets where people may feel that they can learn kendo off the page.

As I explained several times in the book, kendo is a sport or art, depending on how you look at it, which requires interaction between people; whether it is between competitors, training partners or student and instructor. Suburi, footwork and shadow keiko exercises can of course be practiced alone, but are much more motivational when done in a dojo environment with a group of sweating, shouting fellow enthusiasts.

Experienced kendoka can of course work on their cutting action in the home or garden. I remember seeing shinai shaped grooves and scratches on the ceiling of Matsumoto Toshio sensei’s entrance hall and he explained that he had been giving extra instruction to some of his students at his home. Ceiling height is of course a constraint, but we can now buy special suburi shinai that are designed to replicate the weight and feel of a normal shinai while being short enough to swing in a room with average ceiling height. Using this type of equipment you are free to replicate any kendo exercise that you would do in the dojo without a partner; that is providing you take care not to trip over the furniture.

Where I do have concerns about training outside the dojo is where the practitioners are self-taught or have tried to put together their own “styles” by extracting pieces of information from books and videos. YouTube is littered with footage of “kendo stick fighters”. This clip is as good an example as any. The two full sized shinai used nito fashion and the cigarette clamped between the teeth of the young man on the left give early warning that it is not going to end well.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xn4zui_worst-kendo-stick-fight-ever_shortfilms

To my mind you get the most out of home practice if you use it to reinforce and polish what you learn in the dojo. Videos (of real kendo) and books can of course help you understand the finer points of a technique and it is worth both studying information from reliable sources and sharing it with your dojo mates.  Ideally though, your training should follow the principle of Shu-ha-ri.  Shu, when you follow the principles of one instructor, ha, when you start to add your own ideas and ri, when you formulate your own style. Someone should tell the boys in the YouTube clip that they need to do it in that order.

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