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Posts Tagged ‘Kendo Hygiene’

SheepThe Christmas and New Year holidays mean kendo down-time for many of us. Here are some practical tasks that might help improve our kendo to try over next few days, before we get swept up in the pleasant routine of next year’s keiko.

  1. Wash your hakama and keikogi – I am a long term fan of the Japanese ritual of Osoji, making sure that everything is clean and in good order for the coming year. Starting the year with clean dogi feels like a fresh beginning to your keiko.
  2. Make sure shinai and bogu are in good condition – Check take, tighten tsuru and nakayui and replace old himo on bogu.
  3. Treat yourself to a pedicure- buy a foot file, or better still get a professional chiropodist to remove the callouses and hard skin inflicted on your feet by last year’s training. If you miss them don’t worry, you will soon be able to build up another set of kendo hooves.
  4. Find a role model – Think about teachers and senshu whose kendo you admire, ideally find someone with similar physical characteristics to your own. Look at their kendo on YouTube or read anything they have written about their own kendo philosophy and training habits and choose elements to introduce into your own practice.
  5. Practice suburi at home– Chiba sensei in his all-Japan prime used to do 3,000 continuous suburi every day, a few hundred would be a worthwhile activity for most of us. Words of warning –buy a short suburi shinai or watch out for low ceilings and light fittings. We don’t want to alienate our nearest and dearest at this time of year.
  6. Practice breathing – I don’t mean the standard life sustaining in and out stuff, but kendo chokoki tanden  kokyu, breathing in deeply and holding the air in your tanden before breathing out quickly through your mouth. Ideally you should do this sitting in seiza.
  7. Analyse your kendo – think about your keiko over the past year and the elements that felt “right”. Reflect on advice you have received and try to filter out any contradictions. If you have video footage of your kendo look at it in detail and try to understand the points that you should work on.

And that’s it! Another kendo year nearly over! Thank you for reading my blog in 2014. For local kendo friends, I hope to see you  at Sanshukan on Tuesday, I also look forward to meeting up with international friends in Brussels, Tokyo and various other locations over the course of 2015. Rainen mo yoroshiku onegaishimasu. Have a great kendo year.

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